Florida to spend $16.2M to improve infrastructure in 24 rural communities

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Governor Ron DeSantis recently announced $16.2 million in awards for 24 small and rural communities across the state through the Florida Small Cities Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program.

The program, administered by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO), helps communities fund infrastructure improvements and housing rehabilitation. The program is a partnership between the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and DEO.

The projects awarded through the CDBG program include:

  • Calhoun County ($750,000)—to improve existing county roads, drainage and to install fire hydrants. These projects are expected to benefit nearly 100 households including more than 80 low- to moderate-income households.
  • City of Archer ($650,000)—to provide low- to moderate-income households with necessary housing repairs or construction of a portion of the home.
  • City of Bonifay ($650,000)—to rehabilitate four city-owned buildings to bring them up to current building codes with new roofs and interior renovations.
  • City of Bushnell ($700,000)—to rehabilitate the aging, antiquated Lift Station #6 and to repave several roads including Central Ave., Parker Ave., Hunt Ave., West St. and York St. These projects are expected to benefit nearly 500 residents of which more than 350 are low- to moderate-income.
  • City of Coleman ($600,000)—to replace 300 existing water meters with new and improved meters, complete with a monitoring system at all existing water meter locations. This project is expected to benefit more than 700 individuals of which more than 520 are low- to moderate-income.
  • City of Cottondale ($600,000)—to completely replace drinking water lines in 10 different locations of the city. This project is expected to benefit 200 individuals of which more than 150 are low- to moderate-income.
  • City of Fellsmere ($700,000)—to pave and make flood and drainage improvements along streets and to install a swale drain. This project is expected to benefit multiple homes of which most are low- to moderate-income. Funds will be used also to install a city-wide skate park to be used by more than 5,000 individuals of which more than 3,600 are low- to moderate-income.
  • City of Graceville ($650,000)—to renovate the city’s wastewater treatment plant, upgrade the electrical system and restore an associated water treatment site. The project is expected to benefit nearly 2,500 individuals of which more than half are low- to moderate-income.
  • City of Groveland ($700,000)—to rehabilitate, or demolish and replace, low- to moderate-income-household homes that do not meet current building code standards, and to address code-related issues, health and safety measures and green rehabilitation standards.
  • City of Jasper ($700,000)—to replace water service meters with new improved meters with a monitoring system. The project is expected to benefit more than 2,200 individuals of which more than 1,600 are low- to moderate-income.
  • City of Marianna ($700,000)—to replace the West End Lift Station, make improvements to an existing roadway, make flood and drainage improvements, make waterline upgrades and add a new fire hydrant along Evelyn Road.
  • City of Milton ($700,000)—to replace water lines, make drainage improvements and resurface roads in various locations in the city. These projects are expected to benefit more than 200 residents of which more than half are low- to moderate-income.
  • City of Monticello ($700,000)—to rehabilitate, or demolish and replace, low- to moderate-income-household homes that do not meet current building code standards, and to address code-related issues, health and safety measures and green rehabilitation standards.
  • City of Mulberry ($700,000)—to relocate and replace the sewer line lift station, to be constructed on city-owned property located north of the existing pumping station. This project is expected to benefit more than 400 individuals of which nearly all are low- to moderate-income.
  • City of Niceville ($700,000)—to rehabilitate, or demolish and replace, low- to moderate-income-household homes that do not meet current building code standards, and to address code-related issues, health and safety measures and green rehabilitation standards.
  • Holmes County ($750,000)—to rehabilitate, or demolish and replace, low- to moderate-income-household homes that do not meet current building code standards, and to address code-related issues, health and safety measures and green rehabilitation standards.
  • Putnam County ($750,000)—to rehabilitate, or demolish and replace, homes of low- to moderate-income household homes that do not meet current building code standards, and to address code-related issues, health and safety measures and green rehabilitation standards.
  • Town of Callahan ($650,000)—to install water mains to increase system operating pressures, and to improve firefighting capabilities and system reliability. This project is expected to benefit more than 1,300 individuals of which more than half are low- to moderate-income.
  • Town of Greensboro ($650,000)—to repave streets and make flood and drainage improvements in various locations throughout town. This project is expected to benefit more than 300 individuals of which nearly all are low- to moderate-income.
  • Town of Hillard ($700,000)—to replace water and sewer lines and install an emergency electrical generator at the Oxford Street lift station. This project is expected to benefit more than 1,100 individuals of which nearly 600 are low- to moderate-income.
  • Town of Mayo ($650,000)—to rehabilitate, or demolish and replace, low- to moderate-income-household homes that do not meet current building code standards, and to address code-related issues, health and safety measures and green rehabilitation standards.
  • Town of Micanopy ($600,000)—to drill a new well, install a new well pump and make electrical improvements. This project is expected to benefit nearly 700 individuals of which nearly all are low- to moderate-income.
  • Town of Oakland ($600,000)—to fund the installation of new gravity sewer lines, septic tanks and new sewer services. This project is expected to benefit more than 40 occupied homes of which more than half are low- to moderate-income.
  • Town of Pierson ($650,000)—to make water tank, well and treatment plant improvements including the development of a second well field and water treatment plant at Chipper Jones Park. This project is expected to benefit more than 1,750 individuals of which nearly 1,400 are low- to moderate-income.
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